Tuesday, May 24, 2016

The What-How-Why of the Blessed Trinity: Trinity Sunday (Cycle C)

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    Deacon Cliff reminded me today that we are recognizing our graduating seniors. Since today is Trinity Sunday a day in which we are encouraged to preach about the Trinity, I have decided to preach directly to our young people (So mom and dad you can read the bulletin while I preach...Not really!).
   So my young people, today I will take this time to introduce you to someone, but, before I do this, I need to explain to you how I usually do this. In America, we usually introduce someone by saying “so and so meet so and so”.  In Puerto Rico we do it differently, we use what I like to call the “What-How-and-Why” method.
    I can go into a long description of how to do this but I think it will be best if I give an example. Let’s say that I am going to introduce my wife to you. I will say something like: “So and so this is Nancy, my wife of 22 years, and the mother of my 4 kids”.
In one statement I have said 3 things:

  • The What: That she is my wife
  • The How: for 22 years
  • The Why: Because she is the mother of our children

   With a few words, I have given you a general idea of who this person is and what her relationship is to me. The problem with introducing people in this way is that it is very one dimensional. My wife is much more than the mother of my children married to me for 22 years.  For you to really get to know my wife, I would have to do this little what-how-why exercise hundreds of times.
    Now the person I will introduce to you today is The One True God, the Most Blessed Trinity, creator of everything that is visible and invisible. The way I’m going to do this is by presenting   the-What-the-How-and-the-why of The One God.



    So imagine that the Blessed Trinity appears right here today and tells me “Deacon Harbey, I want you to introduce me to the people of St Michael’s parish.” I would say something like: “Hi people of St Michael’s, let me introduce you to God, The Father who IS The Son, and IS the special type of love The Father and The Son share”. You might be thinking that makes no sense.

You are right!

But it gets worse!!

   Do you remember when I said that just one “What-How-Why” statement is not enough to get to know someone? Well...When it comes to the Trinity there is only one statement we can say.  Yes, we can say He is all powerful, all knowing, all present, but these statements only describe what God can do. They do not reveal Him in a personal way. In a personal way, we can only know Him as God who is The father, and The son, and the deep fraternal love They share with each other, which we call the Holy Spirit.
   How can this be? How can one being be three unique individuals? Well, in the Trinity, the What, the How and the Why, the action of being a father, the action of being a son and the active love between these two is so powerful that they become three living separate, independent, individuals(Not beings… There is only one God!). This is why we use the word “person” because they are different and each behave in a different way from the other.
   In a regular human being, the what-how-why is just one idea of who a person is. In the Trinity, this what-how-why is more than an idea; they are personalities.
  Are you confused yet? Wait until you hear this! These 3 personalities live and exist in a relationship, they behave towards each other as members of a family do.
   What do I mean with this?

  • They love each other with infinite love
  • They are individuals, independent of each other, but  united as one God
  • They act independently from each other but are always united in harmony and purpose
  • They interact with each other, they talk between themselves, they enjoy each other’s company, they praise and help each other.

    These are fundamental truths of our faith. If we want to call ourselves Christians, we have to believe all of this, however it is not necessary to understand it. In fact, we will never be able to.
    Now, none of this should come as a surprise to you, we say we believe all that I have just mentioned about God at every mass.  In a few minutes, when we say the Creed, pay attention to when we say these 3 things:

  • I believe in God the Father almighty…
  • ...and in Jesus Christ, the Only begotten Son,
  • I believe in The Holy Spirit who proceeds from the Father and the Son
   A father, who has a son and whose mutual love becomes another person, The Holy Spirit.
   Like I said, this is a great mystery of our faith; one which we should approach in great humbleness.
   Now there is one more thing I would like to say about the three persons of the trinity.  The most important thing I'm going to say today. The persons of the Trinity ARE real persons, they are not a thing or an idea; we can interact with them. If we talk to them they will listen, if we call on them they will answer, but if we pull away from them they will respect the freedom of our choices.
   God The Father, sent God The Son to teach us how, by baptism, we become sons and daughters too. Our destiny is to be active participants in this family which is the Trinity, the One true God.
   Sometimes sin pulls us away from this family, sometimes it actually breaks this bond. The only way we can re-establish this connection is through the Sacraments.
    So my young brothers and sisters in Christ, if today you do not feel this connection, ask The Blessed Trinity to help you, and guide you so that you again can call God The Father “Daddy”, God The Son “My brother” and God the Holy Spirit “My beloved”
Blessed be the Most Holy Trinity, who has shown us His mercy.
Amen.
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Friday, April 22, 2016

Advice to Parents of Children Who Lost Their Faith: 3rd Sunday of Easter

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 This past Wednesday I had to be in 2 different meetings at the same time. In one room there was the Pastoral Council meeting while in the other we had the the Surviving Divorce group. As I left one to attend the other I was surprised to find out that in both meetings they were talking about the same thing: A big problem which affects many families right here at St. Michael’s and the in Church universal -  How to reach young adults in the 15 to 25 year bracket, an age in which God, faith and church have very little significance in their lives.
   What intrigued me was that in both meetings you could hear the sense of betrayal in the voices of the speakers. At the Divorce Survival group it is always heartbreaking to listen to the stories about how many of their children have lost their faith and refuse to attend mass, or have gone to college only to return home claiming, now they are agnostic or atheists. As a member of the pastoral council, is very difficult not to feel bad about the fact that with all the time and talent we invest evangelizing our children there are some who, after their confirmation, never return to church again.
   Now, if you are a parent with this problem I wish I could give you a few words that will make your loved one return to the Church,  but sadly I cannot. However, what I can do is reflect on today’s Gospel for guidance. Because in it we see how Jesus dealt with those who had betrayed him. What I mean is: Judas was not the only one who betrayed Jesus, but Peter and the apostles betrayed him as well.
   The story goes like this: After the resurrection Peter and the apostles decide to go fishing. They spent the night fishing without catching anything, and just when they are tired, hungry and ready to give up,  Jesus meets them and say “Why don’t you try something different?” “Why don’t you, cast your nets but this time do it on the right of the boat?” So they do and they haul in a great catch. Peter, realizing it is Jesus, jumps into the sea and swims to see him, only to be welcomed by Jesus and a charcoal fire. And this detail is quite significant not only because this is only one of two times a charcoal fire is mentioned in the Bible but because the only other time is when Peter denied Jesus, in the courtyard of the high priest, on Good Friday.  For the rest of the apostles, I’m sure the charcoal fire, the bread and fish felt like a welcome rest. So it is easy to think that at this moment the apostles felt safe, secure and relaxed.
     Now Jesus doesn’t waste any time.  He uses this moment to address Peter’s betrayal. But he doesn’t nag, he doesn’t accuse, he doesn’t remind Peter of his failure.  He just asks Peter three times “Do you love me?”.  It is as if Jesus is saying “Peter, you know and I know that you betrayed me. Let's put all that behind us and try to remember, the reason why I called you, why  I  spent 3 years teaching you: I did this because I loved you, and I don’t want you to go back to your old life, I want you to tend my sheep and lead my Church.”
I hope you see now why  I think this reading is the key to help us deal the issue of young people abandoning the faith. In fact, I do not think it is a mere coincidence that the first words on Jesus lips in this reading is “children.”
   Reflecting on how Jesus dealt with the apostles,  I think that we can get 5 principles from this reading:
     First : Do not wait for your children to come to you, go where they are. Jesus did not wait until they were praying, he met them when they were doing what felt comfortable doing: fishing.
     Second: When you get there, do not go to judging, or accusing. Jesus became part of their world, he showed them respect, he even cooked them breakfast! We should let our young people know that we love and appreciate them where they are at the moment!
    Third: Wait until they are comfortable and relaxed to address your concerns. It is easy to accept advice when some one shows us that they love us first. Usually after a nice warm breakfast!   
    Fourth: Explain to them that you do not want them to change anything in their lives, but what you want is for them to look at their lives and ask themselves: are you better, or happier now than the way you were before when you were part of a family and community which loved you and nurtured you? If you are not happy now... Why not try something different? This is what Jesus did when he asked the apostles to cast their nets,  but this time on the right side! Keep living your life but do it the way God wants you to do it, the way you were taught  at Church.
    Finally : Be direct, but not judgemental. Tell them how they make you feel by their turning away from the faith, and let them know you and the Church are praying, waiting for them, with open arms for their return.
    Now Jesus’ method of dealing with betrayal is not based on surveys or psychological profiles, but on the Lord’s knowledge of human nature. Of course Jesus had instant results because, you know... He is God . We on the other hand are not God, we are parents and evangelists who love very much these people who have turned away from our families and communities. So do not expect an instant result. You might have to do this again and again.
    In fact, I’m not claiming that if you do these things young adults will flock back into our church, but what I’m certain of is that if you follow Jesus’ example and keep  praying for our young people, we will see miracles happen in our homes and right here in this building.
God bless you.



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Friday, March 25, 2016

On the Sufferings of Life: Palm Sunday

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       One of my ministries here at St Michael’s is helping people which are going through the process of divorce. I’m a marriage advocate for the marriage tribunal of the archdiocese of Baltimore, and I also participate in the St Michael’s Divorce Survivors group.
      That is a long way of saying I have talked with a lot of people who are in the midst of their divorce.
      It is my experience the vast majority of people who find themselves in this situation live in a state of shock. I listen to them and their stories and I hear the same words again and again:
“I never expected this to happen! I was/am in complete shock”. And it seems that the more unexpected their divorce is to them, the more pain and despair they experience and the higher the sense of betrayal, confusion, fear and loss.
      Those who have gone through this experience will tell you how life shattering it could be. The reality is divorce not the only event in life which will sent you into this tailspin of emotions:
  • The unexpected death of a friend or loved one
  • The betrayal of a friend
  • The serious diagnosis of a life threatening disease
      All these events are like lightning strikes on a clear day. One minute we are happy and content and the next we find ourselves  in the middle of a storm. The fact is, in life no one is immune to these experiences. Everyone has one and there is no assurance they will not happen again.
         You might be wondering what does all this have to do with Palm Sunday?  Well, if you listen to the readings today there is just such a shocking transition in the story. In a matter of minutes we go from Jesus' glorious entrance into Jerusalem to his crucifixion and death. It is as if we are not given time enough to breathe.
         I wish I could tell you that you will never go through a life shattering experience. The truth is I cannot. The only thing I can say is this. The reason why we are here today celebrating Jesus entrance into Jerusalem. The reason why we celebrate Holy Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Easter is to remind us that we never suffer alone. God himself suffers with us because he suffered as one of us. And it is because of His suffering we can make sure our suffering is not wasted. How? By seeing our pain in His pain.
        So, I invite you, during these holy days, to meditate in the sufferings of Christ, and how they reflect your own sufferings. And the hope his death on the cross gives to each one of us. God Bless you.

NOTE: This is a paraphrase of what I said during the Palm Sunday mass homily. I tried to keep it short because it is  a long mass.
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Sunday, December 13, 2015

That Voice Crying out int the Desert: 2nd Sunday of Advent, Cycle C

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  6 Months ago I started a new job. On my way to work I stop at the corner of route 29 and route 198 in Laurel. In this particular spot there is a man who stands with a sign which states he is unemployed and that we will accept any help we can provide.
  As I was reflecting on the person of John the Baptist, I found myself going back to this man and to the different feelings he has caused on me throughout the last 6 months. I remember the very first time I saw him, I felt like just getting out of my car and offering him my help. Of course I could not just abandon my car in the middle of the road, so I had to sit there and stare at him feeling helpless, trying to figure what could I do. As the weeks passed I started looking at him with suspicion -  especially when I noticed someone else with a similar sign on the other corner of this intersection.
   Pretty soon I started to feel a bit angry at him, since people who stopped to give him some money were causing me to miss my turn adding time to my commune (I remember I told myself, here I am the one with a regular job been made late to work by the unemployed!) Well after six months of this, I’m ashamed to admit, I just feel indifference towards him. In fact, I have noticed that other drivers (I assume they are regulars like me, on this busy intersection) have trained themselves to not even make eye contact and just ignore him.  Helplessness, suspicion, anger and indifference; all these feelings just from a man standing in a corner, holding a sign.
  I think it is very proper that in a time of the year in which we are busy and stressed with the million little tasks we need to complete before the “Big Day”, in today’s Gospel, John the Baptist appears standing against the traffic of our busy lives as a voice, “Crying out in the desert”,  reminding us what this season is all about: “A time to change the direction of your lives, to straighten our paths, to smooth our rough ways, because the Lord is near”
  In this Second Sunday of advent, John the Baptist is our man on a corner, holding a sign, asking us how are we doing with our preparations for the coming of our Lord.

   The questions we should be asking ourselves today are not if our houses are ready, or are all the presents wrapped. But, how does John makes me feel, when I hear his call from the desert. Do we feel helpless because although we would want this season to be different, we see ourselves time and time again buying more, wanting more, wasting more?    Are we suspicious of his words, thinking that although it might be nice to refocus our attention in the coming of the Lord, that is the sort of thing which only religious nut jobs and old ladies do? The sort of things me and my family do not appreciate? Do we feel anger at the implication that our way of celebrating Christmas is not the right way? Anger at the implication that our way of life is not the right way of life? Or are we just indifferent, even perhaps numb, at his message to refocus our attention to what is important this season? Refocus our attention into Christ and his coming, and not into having the taller three, the most Xmas lights, the biggest presents.  
   The good news is that helplessness, suspicion, anger and indifference are just feelings, and as feelings they could be overcome by our will, with the help of God’s grace in our lives, which we receive through the sacraments..
   So as we enter this second week of advent, it is up to us to look into ourselves and decide that instead of helplessness this year we will be hopeful that the Lord will truly be born in our hearts, instead of suspicion we will be confident of the promises of our Lord, instead of anger we will love those we encounter, and instead of indifference we will make an effort to appreciate this time we have been given to prepare and receive the Lord like he deserves, with  a humble spirit and a joyous heart.God bless you all.

NOTE: Many people have asked me what happened to my daily compute friend. After I preached this homily I make the point of stopping and talking to him. I gave him my card and told him that if he needs any help he could call me and I can make him contact the proper Catholic charities which will be able to help him. I ask you to say a prayer for this man so that he takes advantage of the help he so much needs.
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Thursday, November 19, 2015

On the Humanity of Pope Francis

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   Pope Francis has done it again!!

   He has open his heart (His very human heart) to the world only to show us that he has the same struggles we have.

   Of course I'm speaking about his remarks to an Italian Lutheran woman married to a Catholic, during Francis' visit to a Roman Lutheran Church. Ms. Anke de Bernardinis asked Francis a very charged question:

Question: My name is Anke de Bernardinis and, like many people in our community, I'm married to an Italian, who is a Roman Catholic Christian. We’ve lived happily together for many years, sharing joys and sorrows. And so we greatly regret being divided in faith and not being able to participate in the Lord's Supper together. What can we do to achieve, finally, communion on this point?

  As a deacon and a family man I have been asked this same questions many times, even by people very close to my heart, and every time I felt torn.  I hear myself giving fine theological points that for someone looking to get closer to the Lord sound more like hollow excuses than two thousand years of  theological Eucharistic reflection.  So it pleased me greatly that in his answer, the Pope,  reflected my own conflicts and struggles while wrestling with this issue. Here is Francis' answer.

Pope Francis: The question on sharing the Lord’s Supper isn’t easy for me to respond to, above all in front of a theologian like Cardinal Kasper! I’m scared!
I think of how the Lord told us when he gave us this command to “do this in memory of me,” and when we share the Lord’s Supper, we recall and we imitate the same as the Lord. And there will be the Lord’s Supper, there will be the eternal banquet in the new Jerusalem, but that will be the last one. In the meantime, I ask myself — and don’t know how to respond — what you’re asking me, I ask myself the question. To share the Lord’s banquet: is it the goal of the path or is it the viaticum [provisions] for walking together? I leave that question to the theologians and those who understand.

It’s true that in a certain sense, to share means there aren’t differences between us, that we have the same doctrine – underscoring that word, a difficult word to understand — but I ask myself: but don’t we have the same Baptism? If we have the same Baptism, shouldn’t we be walking together? You’re a witness also of a profound journey, a journey of marriage: a journey really of the family and human love and of a shared faith, no? We have the same Baptism.

When you feel yourself to be a sinner – and I feel more of a sinner – when your husband feels a sinner, you go to the Lord and ask forgiveness; your husband does the same and also goes to the priest and asks absolution. I’m healed to keep alive the Baptism. When you pray together, that Baptism grows, becomes stronger. When you teach your kids who Jesus is, why Jesus came, what Jesus did for us, you’re doing the same thing, whether in the Lutheran language or the Catholic one, but it’s the same. The question: and the [Lord’s] Supper? There are questions that, only if one is sincere with oneself and with the little theological light one has, must be responded to on one’s own. See for yourself. This is my body. This is my blood. Do it in remembrance of me – this is a viaticum that helps us to journey on.

I once had a great friendship with an Episcopalian bishop who went a little wrong – he was 48 years old, married, two children. This was a discomfort to him – a Catholic wife, Catholic children, him a bishop. He accompanied his wife and children to Mass on Sunday, and then went to worship with his community. It was a step of participation in the Lord’s Supper. Then he went forward, the Lord called him, a just man. To your question, I can only respond with a question: what can I do with my husband, because the Lord’s Supper accompanies me on my path?
It’s a problem each must answer, but a pastor-friend once told me: “We believe that the Lord is present there, he is present. You all believe that the Lord is present. And so what's the difference?” — “Eh, there are explanations, interpretations.” Life is bigger than explanations and interpretations. Always refer back to your baptism. “One faith, one baptism, one Lord.” This is what Paul tells us, and then take the consequences from there. I wouldn’t ever dare to allow this, because it’s not my competence. One baptism, one Lord, one faith. Talk to the Lord and then go forward. I don’t dare to say anything more.

  I have placed the parts which impacted me in BOLD. They impacted me because at one time or another I myself have reflected upon these ideas. But unlike Francis I have never been able to articulate these feelings.

 Why I'm writing this?

  This past Sunday as we were getting ready for mass, a lady approached me and said "Excuse me I am Lutheran may I  commune today?". Once again I was faced with this difficult questions and once again I have to say "I'm sorry but I can not give you communion, but you can come to my line and I will give you a blessing". Which in fact she did, but then something extraordinary happened: this lady (Which latter I learned is the Pastor of a local Lutheran Church), placed her hands upon my shoulders and gave me her blessing. A moment of true Christian union around the Table of the Lord.

  I think that from now, whenever I'm asked this question, instead of jumping into my standard answer heavy on Catholic theology I will just echo Francis words and say:


   The question on sharing the Lord’s Supper isn’t easy for me to respond to. I ask myself — and don’t know how to respond — what you’re asking me, I ask myself this question. But I also ask...  "Don’t we have the same Baptism? If we have the same Baptism, shouldn’t we be walking together?"
   There are questions that, only if one is sincere with oneself and with the little theological light one has, must be responded to on one’s own. To your question, I can only respond with a question: what can I do for you, because the Lord’s Supper accompanies me on my path? It’s a problem each must answer, yes there are explanations, interpretations, but Life is bigger than explanations and interpretations.
   Should I answer your question with a "yes" or a "no"? I wouldn’t ever dare to allow this, because it’s not my competence. One baptism, one Lord, one faith. Talk to the Lord and ask Him to tell you what is the right thing to do and then go forward. I don’t dare to say anything more.

"Viva Cristo Rey!!"
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Some Comments About my Health

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Friends,

     I have been trying to find the best way to do this. I thought about placing a small blurb in our weekly bulletin but that felt a bit pretentious so I finally settle for this blog note. For the last year or so I have been struggling with hoarseness in my voice. Now, my regular voice is naturally hoarse so at first this did not worried me; since this is one of the symptoms during the  Prodrome stage of a migraine attack (just before the Migraine is set to hit). However for the last few months I have had a couple of instances in which I completely loose my voice for a period of a few hours. I finally went to a specialist and he diagnosed me (three months ago) with "Granulomas" on my vocal cords. At that time he indicated that these are most likely caused by acid re-flux and that I should just take it easy and monitor my diet, and go back for another check up in 90 days.
   I returned to see him a couple of weeks back and the news were not as encouraging as I had hoped. He said that the granulomas have expanded and that if I can not get them under control I could loose my voice. He gave me strict instructions not to raise my voice, sing, whisper, yell or strain my voice in any way as well as some medication and the command that I should use my voice as little as possible. He also indicated that if I can not get these under control the only option is surgery which will leave scar tissue and will definitely change my voice as well as require for me to take speech therapy so I can "learn to use my voice again".  I don't know you but these are the worst  news you can give a preacher!
   Of course one of the first things I did was inform my priest about this situation and ask him to pray for me. Him, been the good priest that he is, enlisted the help of our prayer warriors and I have had more people approach me and say "I praying for you" in the last couple of week than in my almost 9 years as deacon! Of course with all these prayers come speculation and based on some of the questions and comments I have received I feel I have to set the record straight.
    First, to use the words of my physician "The good news is that is not cancer". No, I do not have a "lung condition" or some other nasty bug. The reason why I have not been preaching at St Michel's is not because I've been punished, or will be transferred shortly is just because  my voice could not take it and Fr. Mike, Fr. Kurt and Deacon Cliff have come to the rescue in short notice.
   Currently I feel fine, I'm starting to notice I have more better days that bad ones so all the tender care to my vocal cords seen (at least to me) to be working. The one thing you could do for me and my family is pray; if you are no doing this already, ask for the intersession of St Blase, patron Saint of throat illnesses to procure from the Lord the grace of healing (If it is His will), or the grace I will need to endure this time.
   Again I thank you for your prayers and may God bless you richly today.

"Viva Cristo Rey!!"
Deacon Harbey
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Sunday, October 25, 2015

Your Faith has Saved You: 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Cycle B)

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     Since the early years of the Church today’s gospel has been used to encourage and teach Christians about the power of perseverance in prayer. There is something unique about the way Bartimaeus, the blind man in our story, pleads for the Lord’s attention with complete disregard of of the people trying to silence him. Of course a blind man forced to beg charity from others to stay alive, has very little to lose; so he can ignore those who are trying to stop him.  When it comes to praying, Bartimaeus is always a good example to follow because he shows that perseverance always gets God’s attention.
    Now as it often happens with the stories about the Lord, if we look deeper we will find that there is much more going on that just the obvious message. In addition to prayer, this story serves as a guide to what to do, what the Lord expects from us and how he will reward us, when we are confronted with a situation which is becoming more and more common in our culture. I’m speaking about those cases in which Christians are required, even forced to make public declarations of their faith.
   From  Christians murdered for their faith, to public school coaches been disciplined for praying after games, to the removal of crosses and Christian symbols from public spaces, more and more it seems, every time the Christian faith is expressed in public there are always those who are ready and willing to silence us, to use the words of the Gospel they do not waste the chance to “rebuke us and try to make us silent”.

    If we think about it, Bartimaeus plea to The Lord was a declaration of faith. He believes, he has faith that Jesus mercy is the only thing which can help him, and Jesus proves this point when he tells him not "be healed" but “Your faith has saved you”. He pleads and screams, and those around him who only see a blind, dirty beggar discourage him and try to stop him.
    When Jesus finally notices him and calls him we are told that he “threw away his cloak”. Why would the writer point to this action? Because as a first century beggar this cloak, most likely, was Bartimeus most valued and only possession. By throwing it away he shows that for him there was nothing more important that to get Jesus attention, to express his faith in in the power of Jesus.
    But to me the most telling part is what Jesus says to him “What do you want me to do for you?” Here the Lord shows the willingness he has to reward those who call to him in faith and are willing to lose everything they have rather than allowing themselves to be silenced when declaring of their personal faith in Jesus.
    It is very troubling but most likely, today in 21 century America, the chances of having someone, even our own government try to stop us from expressing our faith in public is very high. Let us us pray that the beggar Bartimaeus is an example and a source encouragement for us and let us ask the Lord, like Bartimaeus did, for the light of his Mercy so that we are willing to sacrifice everything we have rather than deny our faith in Him. God bless you all.

NOTE: Today's homily was purposely shorter than normal because the yearly Financial  Report was scheduled for after Communion.
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